1.     Trend Tablet – Constructivism: art & design by Liedewji Edlekoort

Lidewji Edlekoort looks at a new era in interior design where using bright and bold colours on raw, organic and colourless materials makes them “come alive” and modernises them.

Edlekoort explained that the result of this effect is that everyday household furniture will become pieces of work which stand out and,

“Transform our house into a gallery where the consumer becomes the curator”

This was once again an excellent article by Lidewji Edlekoort and showed us how by simply colouring furniture and products we can change the way they are perceived and their impact in a particular environment.

2.     Domus – Contemporary Primitives by Domitilla Dardi

Domitilla Dardi looks at the many designers who are stepping away from mass production and perfection and back to primitive design. To name a few, Francesco Faccin, Hella Jongerius, Max Lamb and Brynjar Sigurðarson. Domitilla discusses how ‘primitive’ no longer has a singular meaning in design and now contemporary,

“primitivism is a taste and concept – a specific choice and by no means  driven by necessity.” (Dardi, 2015)

We really drew on the Domitilla’s idea that we have “reached a highly civilised society” so now we have a particular kind of desire to go back and “begin all over again.” Overall, it was a fantastic article and relates very closely to Iris’ concepts of creating simple line drawings and bringing them to life in the form of jewellery.

 

 

3.     Dezeen magazine – Hella Jongerius calls for “new holistic approach to design”

Dezeen magazine talks about Hella Jongerius’ speech, which she gave earlier this month at the Design Indaba conference in Cape Town. Hella spoke about how design has abandoned quality and is too concerned about making profits. Hella said that,

“If you look at the original values of industrial design, the important values were to connect cultural awareness and social responsibility with practical economics” (Jongerius, 2015)

Dezeen magazine looked at Hella’s five-step design mentality, which helps her to achieve the important values and integrities of design. This was extremely helpful and a great guide for any aspiring designer to work by. We created a short dot point version to make it easier to follow.

 

 

 Hella Jongerius five-point design mentality:

1.     Strive to design your own materials

2.     Use a hands-on design process

3.     Introduce imperfection to industrial processes

4.     Be willing to base your work on pre-existing designs

5.     Have a unique signature so your work in instantly recognisable